Help With Challenging Behaviours

In this case challenging is an adverb, not a verb. We’re not challenging the kids, even though their behaviour is sometimes challenging.

What NEED is the behaviour meeting for that child?

“ADHD is a deficit of regulation, not a deficit of knowledge.”

– Dr. Russell Barkley

“Instead of viewing behaviours purely as difficulties we need to get rid of, it’s helpful to see them as forming an instructional manual for how to support each child.”

– Dr. Mona Delahooke

“A child who seems to be misbehaving is, in the process, adapting and surviving”

– Dr. Mona Delahooke

When we punish behaviours that stem from the child’s divergent neurology, we are essentially punishing a child for having a disability.

Even worse, when we punish behaviours that stem from the child’s divergent neurology, and we haven’t appropriately supported or accommodated their needs, we are essentially punishing a child for having a disability that has been ignored.

The goal is connection, not compliance.

“If caregivers are focused only on modifying behaviour, then all they’re modifying is the signal. But they’re not solving any of the problems that are causing the signal.”

– Dr. Ross Greene

“Behaviorally challenging kids are challenging because they’re lacking the skills to not be challenging.”

– Dr. Ross Greene

If you’re a Medium member, read my article on Neurodiversified.

If you’re a NewsBreak member, read my article on NewsBreak.



Learn more about Dr. Ross Greene’s Collaborative & Proactive Problem Solving approach.

Published by Jillian ADHD 2e MB

Jillian has Child and Youth Work diploma as well as a BA in Psychology. Jillian worked on the front lines of Social Services agencies from 2003 - 2012. Jillian has taken numerous continuing education courses and has attended various workshops focused on supporting neurodiverse children, in particular children with ADHD.

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